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states an authorization to use military force, a declaration of war or any similar authority shall not authorize the detention without charge or trial of a citizen or lawful permanent resident of the united states apprehended in the united states unless an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. that affirms the second circuit's clear statement rule from the padilla case. now, some may ask why this amendment protects green card holders as well as citizens and others may ask why the amendment does not protect all persons apprehended in the united states from indefinite detention. let me make clear i would support providing the protections in this amendment to all persons in the united states, whether lawfully or unlawfully present, but the question is is there enough support in this body to expand this amendment to cover others besides united states citizens and green card holders? i do not believe there is. we got 45 votes last year. we have gained support this year. and so my hope is that at least we can clear the law with a clear statement on citizens and legal resid
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
] on behalf of all of us with the miami book fair, we want to welcome you to the 29th book fair, believe it or not. [cheers and applause] this is a remarkable undertaking. it takes the work of literally hundreds and hundreds of volunteers. we have a remarkable board of directors who work extremely hard at doing this year round. none of this at all could happen without the good, good support of everyone here at miami-dade college, and let's give them a huge round of applause. [applause] >> and we're particularly appreciative of the sponsors. without the sponsors and the funding from foundations and governmental agencies, we would not be able to bring you all this wonderful literary extravaganza. >> and, of course, our friends. many of you are friends to have miami book fair. and a way that you can support this book fair and make sure that it goes on for another 29 years as well. [applause] if you, if you look at downstairs, there's a friends booth, and you're more than welcome to sign up if you'd like. i'd also like to tell you that make sure you pick up a fairgoers' guide on your way out
started. this is live coverage running just a few minutes late. again, a reminder you can follow us on facebook and facebook.com/booktv and we have exclusive updates and author interviews, et cetera on her facebook page. just waiting for mr. patterson. this should be to shortly ensure that coverage of the miami book fair international 29th year. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. please take your seats. we are about to begin the session. thank you so much. i am marilou harrison and many of you have heard from me because he been in this room yesterday and today. i served as a volunteer here, a very proud: tiered of miami book fair international candidate to recognize is that done before, all of the volunteers come to thousands of volunteers for miami dade college as well as the community who come together reach you to think this book fair take place. i'd also like to recognize those who are fri
u.s. air boris it's not down tighter than fort knox. i was not expect dean to see this peasant kind of plot along in front of my airplane. he was 20 feet in front of the jet leading a donkey. i thought, what am i doing here? to donkey kong to relieve himself in front of the airplane and they both should her head at me and walked off. so there's some funny things like that. it basically traces them the path of at least my path as a fighter pilot. i came back from egypt, i've been overseas for six years at the good life. i lived in europe. you guys in the military know you get to travel and do things. so most of the capital cities, you know, a lot of neat things you don't normally see. used to keep a horse by the pyramids. i mean, how cool is that to go riding into the peer nodes. but i wanted to come home. i have not a sonnet worker in a long time and haven't ended to resort to this open past 8:00 at night for a long time and i wanted to come home and i did. i got selected to attend the fighter weapons school out of malice, which is the air force version of the navy school. i darted
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
, or reading is fundamental. give us the background, if you would, ms. rasco, on reading is fundamental. >> guest: well, 46 years ago marchgy mcnamara who was in the cabinet, she went to a meeting that jacqueline kennedy called of all cabinet spouses. and mrs. kennedy is said to have told each spouse we are each going to do something to make washington a better place for the people who live and work here every day. and mrs. mcnamara had a great reputation as a reading tutor. she tutored the wealthier children in town, and she tutored children at very, from very poor economic backgrounds. she had found one day in her tutoring how much it meant to the three boys she was tutoring at a local public school to be given a book. she had brought books that her children had had years before and had been left at home, of course. and she let each of them take a book home. well, one of the mothers came to the school the next day to return the stolen book, and they said, no, we want the child to have the book, and that started a tradition of rif when they present a book to a child of writing the chil
nations, was the weight to get alongside these afghans, and we saw -- i was in kabul when the two u.s. officers were shot in the national military police coordination center in the moi. there was an absolute bizarre for those who were present on the day to -- doug touched on this as proximity with the afghans, and it's very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> [inaudible] >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful withdrawal of u.k. combat troops by the end of 2014. >> i absolutely understand the investments, and there's a lot of material. my headquarters absolutely understand how much we have got to move over the time? >> the overall general plan of withdrawal, will you be able to be successful do you think? >> yes, i will. noting, of course, that the national operation is inside a wider nato operation, and a great deal of work is being done in nato to deliver that coordination. >> thanks. >> i want the to ask along the table, are we seriously led to believe that on the january the 1st, 2015, that the afghan national security forces will be susta
candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. following responses to the que
out an electoral victory. we'd like to welcome everybody who's joining us now on c-span2. if you're on c-span 1, you have to switch over. if you had a friend that didn't switch over, run over there, pound on that door. you can join us at politico.com, there's an e-mail that will come directly to us onset. we're going to bring you into the conversation. it's 10:00, the polls have closed in most of the states that will determine the outcome of this election. i would say if you wanted to step back and where do we stand at 10:00 on election night, the big headline, the one headline we know for sure, joe donnelly won the senate seat for democrats in indiana, a huge and what unexpected victory for democrats, makes it almost impossible for republicans to win back the senate. we have declared long ago that the house will stay in republican hands, it now looks like the senate will stay in democratic hands. so it's all down to the presidential race about whether or not we have a status quo, divided government in washington. the early states that have been called are very much looking in ba
been left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with their parents and we don't talk about how immigration breaks out families and and, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this because, you know, it's something that is -- it's an experience that definitely scared me, that has really shaped the woman i am today, and then also it's an experience that i think right now with the dreamers, you know, with the young undocumented people who are fighting to get their legal status, i felt it was an important story in terms of giving people an inside to what their situation might be like and i touch upon the fact that, you know, my family benefited from the amnesty of 1980, i had a green card by the time i was 14. so the moment i got my green card, you know, the whole world just opened up to me and there were so many possibilities that came my way that i was able to jump on because i had a green card. and i would really love to see this happen to the dreamers, you know, for us to give them that chance to pursue
.. that is really a surrogate for a lot of things many of us would like to see with respect to climate policy, energy efficiency gets you in the same direction. and as the senator said, that is something on which congress has demonstrated as recently as the last five or six years that it can come together, and i think it could do it again and in a more aggressive way to get advantage of the opportunities which we now know that we have. some states have already experienced it and by the way some of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move thos
for us because you write about our past and the impact in the city. thank you so much. >> oh, you're certainly welcome. [applause] >> yes. [applause] >> [inaudible] >> let's thank him. [applause] >> if you give us a couple minutes, we're going to set up for the autographing. if you want to buy a book, they are out that way. we have plenty of them. mr. wolff will be out there signing books. we're going to have to do away with personalization tonight if that's all right. please, please be understanding of that. anyway, thank you, all, we'll see you tomorrow night. [inaudible conversations] ♪ [inaudible conversations] >>> that was tom wolff from the miami book festival international. visit booktv.org for a complete schedule of the book fair coverage all weekend long november 17th and 18th. we have author talks, panel discussions, and interviewed scheduled as well as taking questions live throughout each day. check us out on twitter, facebook, e-mail us, or give us a call. >> here's a look at the books being publish this week: >> what i discovered is jefferson appears to be a man of
of us with the miami book fair, we want to youe welcome you to the 29th book not fair.applause] this is a remarkable undertaking. it takes the work of literally hundreds and hundreds of volunteers. we have a remarkable board of directors who work extremely hard at doing this year round. none of this at all could happen without the good, good support of everyone here at miami-dade college, and let's give them a huge round of applause. [applause] >> and we're particularly appreciative of the sponsors. without the sponsors and the funding from foundations and governmental agencies, we would not be able to bring you all this wonderful literary extravaganza. >> and, of course, our friends. many of you are friends to have miami book fair. and a way that you can support this book fair and make sure that it goes on for another 29 years as well. [applause] if you, if you look at downstairs, there's a friends booth, and you're more than welcome to sign up if you'd like. i'd also like to tell you that make sure you pick up a fairgoers' guide on your way out. we have a remarkable
for the longer-term trajectory of libya. that is a very useful thing to have on the table. thank you very much. thanks to the speakers who stuck so closely to time that we have almost a full hour for discussion which is really terrific and i will be taking questions. i want to ask our speakers briefly, a big question which is very briefly, you were fabulous in presenting us with diagnoses of issues. you talk a little about strategies. a bit more along those lines given the diagnosis that you each presented of the case in which you were working, just say briefly where you think the most promising opportunities might be for making progress dealing with the kinds of issues you and i like and because you did the overview will exempt you -- >> to go back to the theoretical discussions one basis to the steps in the concept, the first step is assessment and the second is strategic planning, it is appropriate we start here because we were taking and s s r classic s s r breach to these problems, and evaluation so that -- what is missing is this lack of assessments of strategic planning. when we were in
in this world than the u.s. military, to understand and think through all the secondary and tertiary, primary elements of a plan and how to execute it. so, leveraging that skill set and engaging with the appropriate authorities on how to respond to a health emergency, and how you would address these issues well before the incident occurs is probably the best solution. now, those teams probably exist to do that. but whether or not, it really depends on their maturity of that country and its ability to leverage very scarce resources. just like in the u.s., our health care professionals barely have enough time to address the day-to-day health care needs of the population, let alone planning for emergency. this is the challenge, but i think this is where the military and the u.s., in collaboration with its other federal partners, can be extraordinarily successful. >> in the back. i think we're probably just about running out of time, so the mic is behind you. core question. >> i'd like to refer back -- university of wisconsin republic referred back to ambassador hume's reference to the shipping i
injuring himself into a program at walter reed what it ended up using acupuncture, using meditation, using other techniques to wean him off of all the drugs that he was on, and through this program he actually was able to walk out of walter reed on his own two feet. so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for one, for allowing us to tell this story, both good and bad, but for recognizing this problem by recognizing that there is this problem of overmedication and that they are looking for outside the box ideas and how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film really, the metaphor of "escape fire" is the status quo isn't working and we need to start looking for outside the box ideas. >> more with matthew heineman, producer and director of "escape fire," the fight to rescue america's health care. sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> live picture from the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c., a discussion just getting underway with political analysts and pollsters taking a look at the election numbers and examining a voter turnout and
in advance of a disaster? i think all of us agree with that. .. being that building relations with the people rising sow africa and the specifically aimed at building a capacity for administering hiv treatment in a country where the civilian authorities said they would never allow it. your point is well taken and sometimes there are opportunities to do that. >> of i can also. one of the most important ways to prevent is to do credible and reliable health surveillance. in many countries for which we have no strong visibility on the presence of infectious disease and with such a mobile world, undetected infectious diseases are a threat to us all. >> thank you. >> if you can see the hands better than i can, people with their hands up, position yourself and we will get the next time around. >> thank you for your presentation. as you know, there has been a debate about what health can contribute to security. there is agreement that health intervention and human security, and also the united states has a major role in humanitarian spots and that is not necessarily driven by national security consid
"everything bad is good for you: how today's popular culture is actually making us smarter", he writes the great unsung story of our culture today is how many welcome trends are going up. anthony in san antonio, texas. you are on booktv with steven johnson. >> caller: good morning, mr. johnson. let me just say what a distinct pleasure it is to talk to you. i want to say in 2005, i was a counselor educator and i taught a continuing education class counselors throughout the san antonio community. believe me, i used your book, the looks were bewilderment and total aggravation. the title freak them out. learning is prefigured. the kids were teaching me. i didn't know anything about computers. how are we going to use it to guard against plagiarism? this had nothing to do with it. the resistance, as the time went on, and when i wrote my little blurb on amazon at 11 responses, only two people agreed with it. so this resistance among practitioners had to be tremendous. when the little kid wrote the iphone initiative about two or three years ago, and i played that in one of my classes, the ones
are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: yes i would first like to congratulate the american people on using good sense by reelecting a president. mr. romney had no plans. he was just offering the opposite of what the president was presenting to the american people. have no plan for anything. i don't know how anybody in his position could get as far as he did with nothing to offer the american people. the other thing -- i just don't understand how with the american people would think to even consider him as the presidential candidate. he had absolutely nothing to offer. everything he offered was nonexistent or i will just do the president isn't doing. >> host: but the ask you, you sound like you're passionately supportive of the president. >> caller: i'm passionate for the country. i don't care who obama our romney is. i want somebody that will help the american people to progress. i want to see america -- >> host: you want compromise? >> caller: i want compromise, yes. but i'm going to tell you this, and make no mistake about it, we have people in this country that have completely destroyed rath
the u.s. squarely in the center of the world. the eurasian continent was split into, as parentheses to the u.s. in order to accommodate this you. i believe i have struggled against this distortion of the u.s. is both literal and symbolic place in the world all my life. we are close in age. so i wonder if you encounter the same perpetual distortion and subsequent challenge? you have 30 seconds. >> absolutely something i write about in don't know much about geography. specifically, most of us grew up with a certain, what is called, projection of the world. greenland looks like it is big, if up in africa. so, as things get turned around and given proportionally, i also included in that book of maps that just turns north and south america upside-down. what would happen if we looked at -- there's no reason we can look at it that way. north doesn't have to be a top. we could put south of the top who wanted to. >> host: we will have to leave it there. i apologize. out of time. kenneth davis has been our guest here on "in-depth". . . >> your internet is 20 times faster uploading and 10 time
. it makes a statement about what u.s. policies should be regarding the disposition of sexual assault charges in the military. these -- all of these requests came from women in the military. my office have been working with these women. they signed up to serve. they performed their service well and honorably. if in the course of their service they experience an assault that could have been prevented, an assault that would not have been experienced if they had not volunteered for the service, then we owe them, our country owes them the basic decency of ensuring them a fair trial, fair access to health benefits and the promise of justice. that is the goal of our amendments. i appreciate again the leadership of senator levin and senator mccain in the only working with me last year to dramatically alter this policy so these records are now preserved for 50 years but this year to work on improvements to that policy once again. thank you, madam president. i yield the floor. madam president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presidi
is a 21st century poll tax. and those of us in the south who have a history where poll taxes were used to restrict voters, what you, in effect, have by having these extensive lines, if you are -- work on an hourly basis or can only get off a bit of time and -- you can't afford to wait three and four and five hours in line to vote. this legislation, the fair, accurate, secure and timely voting act of 2012, the so-called fast act, creates a competitive grant program to encourage states to aggressively pursue election reforms. it would provide incentives for states like virginia to invest in practices and technology designed to expedite voting at the polls and simplify voter registration. the fast voting act addresses this issue in a responsible way. it doesn't add new mandates. it authorizes simply additional resources for those states which start up -- step up with commonsense reforms to make voting faster and more accessible to voters. this is a relatively very small program but a few dollars spent to both increase the process, increase the number of voting machines at those polling pl
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